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Treatment Development Program Clinical Trials

New York Presbyterian Hospital at Columbia University

[object Object]Three alopecia areata clinical trials are getting underway through New York Presbyterian Hospital at Columbia University led by NAAF Advisory Council member Dr. Julian Mackay-Wiggan.  Strict rules around the way potential participants are informed about clinical trial opportunities require us to use the specific wording approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Columbia.  Excerpts from these IRB-approved study announcements are below with links to complete flyers with contact information for each study: 

  • Intralesional steroids are the most commonly used treatment for alopecia areata, yet much remains unknown about the risks and benefits of different doses of intralesional steroids. The goal of this study is to answer some of those questions.  Enrollment for this study has been completed. This study is ongoing but no longer recruiting participants. 
  • Many people in the U.S. suffer from alopecia areata, yet treatment options are limited and sometimes painful. The goal of this study is to test a medication, given as a subcutaneous injection that acts on the immune system and may reverse hair loss. This subcutaneous medication has been used to safely and successfully treat other diseases, and is now being newly tested for treatment of Alopecia Areata. Enrollment for this study has been completed. This study is ongoing but no longer recruiting participants.
  • Many people in the U.S. suffer from alopecia areata, yet treatment options are limited and sometimes painful. The goal of this study is to test a new medication taken as a pill that acts on the immune system and may reverse hair loss. This is an oral medication has been used to safely and successfully treat other diseases, and is now being newly tested for treatment of Alopecia Areata.   Enrollment for this study has been completed. This study is ongoing but no longer recruiting participants. 

The Alopecia Areata Registry, Biobank and Clinical Trials Network (Registry) will be utilized to solicit participants, so keep an eye out if you are a member in the greater New York metropolitan area.  If you are not near New York, but would like to help with future clinical trials, please join the Registry and add to our nearly 10,000 registrants.

Disclaimer:
NAAF provides research notices as an informational service to its members. NAAF is not conducting the study. This information does not represent a NAAF endorsement, but rather makes you aware that clinical studies are available for your participation if you choose. If you are presently under the care of a physician for alopecia areata, or other conditions, you should discuss this study with your doctor before altering your treatment program. NAAF is not responsible for any adverse outcomes.

NAAF Encouraged by Yale University School of Medicine Study

The National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) is encouraged by the results of an 8-month course of treatment conducted by researchers at Yale University School of Medicine in which a 25-year-old male patient with alopecia areata universalis was able to regrow a full head of hair, along with eyebrows, eyelashes, and facial, armpit, and other hair when put on a regimen of tofacitinib citrate, an FDA-approved treatment for arthritis.  The drug has also been successfully used in the treatment of psoriasis. 

While we remain hopeful, we wish to remind the alopecia areata community this is a preliminary study with the effects of the drug studied on only one individual.  It should be considered preliminary and not validated at this point, and remains to be further studied in clinical trials.  

A clinical trial with this drug will be starting at Columbia University in the fall of 2014.

Free Type-1 Diabetes Risk Screening Through TrialNet

TrialNetType 1 Diabetes TrialNet (TrialNet) is an international network of researchers who are exploring ways to prevent, delay and reverse the progression of type 1 diabetes. Alopecia Areata families have a higher incidence of other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Relatives of someone with T1D have 15 to 20 times the risk to develop the disease.

TrialNet is offering T1D risk screening to blood relatives of someone with T1D through a blood test performed at no cost and available anywhere in the US. If there is a person with T1D in your family (defined as someone with diabetes diagnosed before age 40 who was started on insulin within the first year), then you or other relatives between the ages of 1 and 45 may be eligible for screening.

Family members who are identified at high risk through blood testing are offered close monitoring and, if eligible, the opportunity to participate in T1D prevention trials. 

We want to put an end to type 1 diabetes and need your help to do so. Click HERE to learn more about T1D risk screening and T1D prevention research. You can also call 1-800-425-8361 or email TrialNet for more information.

Kenalog-10
Minneapolis, MN

Dr. Maria Hordinsky, at the University of Minnesota is conducting a study examining the relationship between a commonly utilized treatment for alopecia areata, Kenalog-10 intralesional injections in combination with a filler

Otherwise healthy patients diagnosed with alopecia areata with over 50% of scalp involvement will be eligible for enrollment in this study. Those enrolled will undergo intralesional Kenalog-10 (triamcinolone acetonide10mg/mL) and filler injections every 6 weeks for a period 12 weeks. This period will be followed by a 6 injection-free, follow-up visit. This study will advance the understanding of the effects of this highly utilized therapy in combination with a filler.

For more information or if you would like to be involved, please contact the University of Minnesota Department of Dermatology:

Kathleen Kane
612-624-5721
krkane@umn.edu

ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov offers up-to-date information for locating federally and privately supported clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions. A clinical trial (also clinical research) is a research study in human volunteers to answer specific health questions. Interventional trials determine whether experimental treatments or new ways of using known therapies are safe and effective under controlled environments. Observational trials address health issues in large groups of people or populations in natural settings.

Visit this website to review clinical trials that are enrolling around the country on alopecia areata and other diseases.

Disclaimer:
NAAF provides research notices as an informational service to its members. NAAF is not conducting the study. This information does not represent a NAAF endorsement, but rather makes you aware that clinical studies are available for your participation if you choose. If you are presently under the care of a physician for alopecia areata, or other conditions, you should discuss this study with your doctor before altering your treatment program. NAAF is not responsible for any adverse outcomes.

 


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